Two Fortunes

Catherine

Catherine inherits a large fortune when she turns 17.

She happily starts spending it on things that please her: a new car, designer clothes, Christian

Louboutin shoes, nights out with her friends, lavish parties, and exciting vacations across the world. She wants to start her own company eventually, but for now she enjoys not working and living life like a movie star. When Catherine hits her mid-twenties, she notices her fortune is close to half what it once was when she inherited it. It is still plenty, but she realizes it won’t last forever and she should start investing some of it.

She takes meetings from many companies who are salivating for her money. Many pitchmen and executives’ wine and dine her and make her promises about what her return on investment will be.

She picks an exciting company – a high risk, high reward venture. She dreams of recovering all the riches she once had and then some. Unfortunately, the company fails. It seems the pitchman may have lied to her, and frauded other investors as well.

Seeing more of her fortune dwindle, Catherine picks another high risk/high reward company to try to gain it back. When it fails, she tries another.

When Catherine crosses her thirtieth birthday, her fortune is about 1/9th what it once was when she inherited it.

Catherine realizes now she needs some guaranteed return. With her now rather small sum to invest, no executives are wining and dining her or competing for her money. She picks a stable, blue chip company to put her money in. To the company, her investment is modest and fairly replaceable.

Catherine has always dreamed of starting a small company of her own, but her financial advisor tells her she will probably have to take out a loan to do it.

This makes her very sad.

She tries to start a company, but she can’t and an angel investor to help it flourish, and it fails.

She withdraws money from her stable investment to live on throughout her late thirties and forties, occasionally hoping for a visit from an enthusiastic start-up who can turn her modest money into the large fortune she once had, but that visit never comes.

Shortly after she turns fifty, Catherine’s money is nearly gone, and she has to start working.

Monica

Monica inherits a large fortune when she turns 17.

She holds it for a few years, putting it in an account and being very choosy about how to spend it. After some time, she realizes that inflation and expenses are slowing eating away at her money, so she decides to invest.

Many executives and pitchmen are willing to wine and dine her for her money. She sees through the flashy salesman offering risky propositions and promising high returns. She chooses a stable company with a good reputation: Blue Chip, Inc.

The dividends are immediate: Modest but steady.

Being such a large investor, Blue Chip, Inc treats her like gold. Her money helps them enthusiastically expand operations and bring in new revenue streams.

Occasionally a slick talking salesman comes around promising her billions for a small investment but she rebuts them quickly, seeing a great future with Blue Chip, Inc.

In her twenties with the steady dividends coming in, Monica decides to start her own small companies – 4 in all. Since she is such a profitable, trustworthy and loyal business partner, Blue Chip, Inc is happy to invest in Monica’s companies and offer business and legal expertise to help them thrive.

Her thirties are a happy time as she runs her four companies, bringing them towards profitability. It is tough but satisfying.

In her late forties and fifties, her small companies all grow profitable and strong enough to support offshoot companies of their own. She has some stock in these companies as well. Being a trusted partner for so long, Blue Chip, Inc invests as well.

Monica has grown rich beyond her wildest dreams. She lives off the large dividends she still gets from Blue Chip, Inc and reinvests the rest in her companies.

She will never have to work again.

5 thoughts on “Two Fortunes

  1. EM2 says:

    This is an incredible analogy, everyone will get it.

  2. Turtle says:

    it seems like you are obsessed with women being promiscuous. we get it bro, it is a reality of the world. accept it and move on. stop being a salty incel.

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